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January Trends Tracker

Trends Tracker

Companies Covered: AAPL, ADDYY, AMZN, BBBY, BBRY, CMG, DISH, EXPE, FB, GOOG/GOOGL, KYAK, MCD, NFLX, NKE, OWW, PCLN, PNRA, QSR, RH, SKX, SIRI, TGT, TPE:2498, TRIP, TWTR, TWX, TYO:6758, UA, W, WEN, YUM


Click here to download the report (.pdf)

 

Summary of Findings

  • McDonald’s Corp.’s (MCD) saw declining attendance for the first time since July, with respondents’ visits to its restaurants off from the high level in December. Its all-day breakfast menu gained in popularity for monthly visits, while respondents’ daily and weekly orders from the menu have slowed from November and December to settle back to levels reported in October. Yum! Brands Inc.’s (YUM) Taco Bell, Wendy’s Co. (WEN) and Panera Bread Co. (PNRA) saw increased foot traffic quarter to quarter, but respondents’ mentions declined for Restaurant Brands International Inc.’s (QSR) Burger King, Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc. (CMG) and Doctor’s Associates Inc.’s Subway.
  • Expedia Inc. (EXPE) was respondents’ most preferred OTA service, up 10.9% (1.4 percentage points) from July. The next three most popular OTAs—Expedia’s Travelocity, TripAdvisor Inc. (TRIP) and Kayak Software Corp. (KYAK)—all have declined in preference, while Priceline Group Inc. (PCLN) jumped 39.4% (1.3 percentage points).
  • com Inc. (AMZN) is being used more than any other retailer for home décor and furnishings, up 71.3% (7.2 percentage points) compared with six months ago. 18- to 29-year-olds still are the most likely to shop on Amazon for home décor and furnishings. Thrift stores, Target Corp. (TGT) and Wayfair Inc. (W) also experienced growth since July, up 19.4% (1.9 percentage points), 1.6% (0.2 percentage points) and 15.4% (0.2 percentage points), respectively. On the other hand, Bed Bath & Beyond Inc. (BBBY) and Restoration Hardware Holdings Inc. (RH) received fewer mentions than in July, falling 22.1% (3 percentage points) and 46.2% (0.6 percentage point).
  • Smartphone use increased more than any other form of in-car entertainment, up 45.5% (6.1 percentage points) across all age groups and led by twice as many 45- to 59-year-olds as a year ago. In-car satellite radio usage also is up in all age groups and in income levels above $25,000, which will benefit such companies as SiriusXM Holdings Inc. (SIRI). Respondents in all age groups other than 60 or older continue to decrease their use of embedded infotainment systems. These now are used in cars by only 3.1% of respondents.
  • Younger respondents, specifically 18- to 29-year-olds, are the most interested and most likely to purchase a virtual reality (VR) system for their homes in the next six months. Of all respondents, 4.4% are very or extremely likely to purchase a VR system for their home during this period.

 

Introduction

Welcome to Blueshift Research’s 19th edition of the Trends Tracker. This monthly research survey tracks the most pressing topics affecting U.S. consumers as well as business and investment theses. We monitor trends to see how respondents’ opinions evolve, and frequently update survey questions with new issues that emerge from our research and observations.

This month’s Trends Tracker comprises 1,038 respondents who represent a general sample of the U.S. public and who answered questions on Jan. 14 and 15. Blueshift utilized Census data to balance respondents by gender and age so that the sample aligns with the U.S. population. For this survey, we added the topics of virtual reality and gun purchases.

 

Location of Topics

  1. Fast-food/quick-service restaurants
  2. OTAs
  3. Home décor and furnishings
  4. In-car entertainment
  5. Virtual reality
  6. Pay-TV/OTT/cord-cutting
  7. Social media ads
  8. Vacation/property rental sites
  9. Athletic shoes
  10. Gun purchases
  11. Hybrid and electric car adoption
  12. GMO/GMO labeling
  13. Digital/mobile wallets
  14. Ad-blocking tools
  15. Presidential election

 

Topics

1) McDonald’s takes a step back in attendance from strong fall trends, while orders from its all-day breakfast have increased as monthly, rather than daily or weekly, occurrences. Taco Bell, Wendy’s and Panera are trending positive.

The number of respondents eating at McDonald’s has fallen since October. Also, the average number of fast-food/quick-service restaurants (QSRs) frequented by 18- to 29-year-olds and those 60 or older dropped in the past month.

McDonald’s had a very steady climb of respondents eating at its establishment from July to December. The decline in attendance in January represents the first drop since Blueshift started tracking respondents’ visits to McDonald’s in July 2015. It may represent the beginning of a slide from a December peak, or it simply could be respondents making New Year’s resolutions to eat healthier.

Ordering from McDonald’s all-day breakfast is settling in as an occasional occurrence. Overall, the number of respondents ordering from the menu at a non-breakfast time increased 61.6% (10.1 percentage points) compared with October, when it was launched nationally. Those who eat from the all-day breakfast menu at a non-breakfast time daily or weekly have returned to levels seen in October, after spiking in November and December. However, those eating ordering from the menu monthly or annually continued to rise since October. Respondents who have not ordered off of the all-day breakfast menu during a non-breakfast time and do not plan to do so grew 2.3% (0.8 percentage point).

The number of respondents who view McDonald’s as better than most others or as the best fast-food/QSR is higher than in October and is growing at nearly twice the rate as those who view McDonald’s as worse than or as the worst fast-food/QSR. 18- to 29-year-olds were the only age group to have more respondents who believe McDonald’s is worse or is the worst best fast-food/QSR than those who find it to be better or the best fast-food/QSR.

Taco Bell experienced the greatest increase in respondents eating at its establishment, up 14.1% (3.1 percentage points). Wendy’s and Panera, the second and third most frequently mentioned, saw foot traffic increase quarter to quarter, up 7.4% (1.8 percentage points) and 8.1% (1.2 percentage points).

Burger King, Chipotle and Subway have lost customers among our respondents since October, down 9.2% (2.4 percentage points), 11.9% (1.9 percentage points) and 4.9% (1.4 percentage points), respectively.

 

At which fast-food/QSRs have you eaten in the past month? Select all that apply.

  • 43.1% have eaten at McDonald’s during the past month, down 7.1% (3.3 percentage points) quarter to quarter.
    • All age groups, except 45- to 59-year-olds, had fewer respondents who recently have eaten at McDonald’s.
  • 27.4% have eaten at Subway during the past month, a 4.9% (1.4 percentage-point) decrease quarter to quarter.
    • All age groups, except 45- to 59-year-olds, have decreased their visits to Subway.
  • 26.1% have eaten at Wendy’s during the past month, a 7.4% (1.8 percentage-point) increase quarter to quarter.
    • 45- to 59-year-olds were the only age group to have more respondents who have eaten at Wendy’s.
  • 25.1% have eaten at Taco Bell during the past month, a 14.1% (3.1 percentage-point) increase quarter to quarter.
    • 30- to 59-year-olds have increased their visits to Taco Bell quarter to quarter.
  • 23.6% have eaten at Burger King during the past month, down 9.2% (2.4 percentage points) quarter to quarter.
    • All age groups, except those 60 or older, had fewer respondents who have eaten at Burger King.
  • 16.1% have eaten at Panera during the past month, an 8.1% (1.2 percentage-point) increase quarter to quarter.
    • Panera visits have increased among 30- to 59-year-olds but have been steady among those 60 or older.
  • 14% have eaten at Chipotle during the past month, down 11.9% (1.9 percentage points) quarter to quarter.
    • All age groups, except 30- to 44-year-olds, had fewer respondents who have eaten at Chipotle.
    • 18- to 29-year-olds still are Chipotle’s most common customers.
  • 12.3% have not eaten at any fast-food/QSR in the past month, up 2.5% (0.3 percentage point) quarter to quarter.
    • 30- to 44-year-olds were the only age group to have fewer respondents not eat at fast-food/QSRs.
  • 30- to 59-year-olds increased the average number of fast-food/QSRs they frequented quarter to quarter, but the average declined among 18- to 29-year-olds and those 60 or older.
    • Compared with December, the average number of fast-food/QSRs frequented dropped in all age groups.
    • 30- to 44-year-olds frequented fast-food/QSRs most often, an average 3.97 visits.
  • McDonald’s showed steady growth in attendance each month from July to December. January 2016 saw a precipitous decline from the peak in December.

 

How does McDonald’s compare with all other fast-food/QSRs?

  • 46.1% think McDonald’s is on par with other fast-food/QSRs, down 2.3% (1.1 percentage points) quarter to quarter.
  • 19.5% think McDonald’s is better than most others or is the best fast-food/QSR, up 10.2% (1.8 percentage points).
    • All age groups, except 18- to 29-year-olds, posted an increase quarter to quarter in the number of respondents who said McDonald’s is better than others or is the best fast-food/QSR.
    • 45- to 59-year-olds now have the greatest percentage of those who believe McDonald’s is better than others or is the best fast-food/QSR.
  • 19.3% do not eat at McDonald’s, 6.8% (1.4 percentage points) less quarter to quarter.
    • Respondents 30 to 44 years old or at least 60 were the two age groups to see a decrease in the number of those who do not eat at McDonald’s.
    • All income levels except those making $100,000 to $149,999 saw a decrease in the number of respondents who do not eat at McDonald’s.
  • 15.2% think McDonald’s is worse than others or is the worst fast-food/QSR, up 5.6% (0.8 percentage point).
    • 18- to 44-year-olds posted an increase in the number of respondents who said McDonald’s is worse than others or is the worst fast-food/QSR.
    • 18- to 29-year-olds now have the greatest percentage of those who believe McDonald’s is worse than others or is the worst fast-food/QSR compared with other age groups.

 

Have you ordered off McDonald’s all-day breakfast menu during a non-breakfast time?

  • 34.9% have not ordered off of the all-day breakfast menu during a non-breakfast time and do not plan to do so, up 2.3% (0.8 percentage point) quarter to quarter.
    • Those 44 or younger are more likely to have not tried the all-day breakfast at a non-breakfast time and to have no plans to do so quarter to quarter.
  • 28.5% have not ordered off of the all-day breakfast menu during a non-breakfast time but to have plans to do so, down 27.1% (10.6 percentage points) quarter to quarter
    • All age groups had fewer respondents who have not ordered off of the all-day breakfast menu during a non-breakfast time but plan to do so.
  • 26.5% have ordered off of the all-day breakfast menu at McDonald’s during a non-breakfast time and would do it again, a 61.6% (10.1 percentage-point) increase quarter to quarter.
    • All age groups are more likely to order off the all-day breakfast menu during a non-breakfast time and to plan to do it again quarter to quarter.
    • 45- to 59-year-olds increased the most, up 163.6% (16.2 percentage points) quarter to quarter.
  • 3.2% ordered off of the all-day breakfast menu during a non-breakfast time and would not do it again, up 60% (1.2 percentage points).
    • Respondents 60 or older and 30- to 44-year-olds were the most likely to order off of the all-day breakfast menu during a non-breakfast time and to not do it again.

 

 

2) Expedia remains the top OTA, and more respondents prefer its service than six months ago.

Expedia still is the most preferred OTA, and more respondents prefer its service than six months ago, up 10.9% (1.4 percentage points). Expedia received more mentions than six months ago from all age groups, except those 60 or older. Booking directly with the airline or hotel is the second most preferred way, but its number of mentions fell 12.6% (1.4 percentage points) compared with six months ago. TripAdvisor, Kayak and Priceline rounded out the top five OTAs; the first two declined in preference 12.5% (0.8 percentage point) and 21.7% (1.5 percentage points), respectively, but Priceline mentions increased 39.4% (1.3 percentage points). Orbitz Worldwide Inc. (OWW) was another OTA that fewer respondents prefer compared with six months ago, down 2.4% (0.1 percentage point).

 

Which is your preferred OTA for booking trips, flights, hotels and/or rental cars?

  • 14.2% prefer Expedia, up 10.9% (1.4 percentage points) compared with six months ago.
    • All age groups, except those 60 or older, posted an increase in their preference for Expedia.
  • 9.7% book directly with the airline or hotel, a 12.6% (1.4 percentage-point) decrease.
  • 5.6% prefer TripAdvisor, a 12.5% (0.8 percentage-point) decrease compared six months ago.
    • All age groups, except 45- to 59-year-olds, posted an decline in their preference for TripAdvisor.
  • 5.4% prefer Kayak, down 21.7% (1.5 percentage points) compared with six months ago.
    • All age groups voiced a decline in their preference for Kayak compared with six months ago.
  • 4.6% prefer Priceline, a 39.4% (1.3 percentage-point) increase compared with six months ago.
    • 30- to 59-year-olds increased in their preference for Priceline.
  • 4.1% prefer Orbitz, a 2.4% (0.1 percentage-point) decrease compared with six months ago.
    • 45- to 59-year-olds were the only age group to report a decline in their preference for Orbitz.
  • 33.1% do not use OTAs, up 3.8% (1.2 percentage points) compared with six months ago.
    • 18- to 44-year-olds have more respondents who do not use OTAs compared with six months ago.

 

 

3) Amazon dominates other retailers as the top shop for home décor and furnishings.

Amazon is being used more than any other retailer for home décor and furnishings. The number of respondents shopping for these products on Amazon increased 71.3% (7.2 percentage points) compared with six months ago. All age groups and income levels are increasing their use of Amazon for home décor and furnishing compared with six months ago. 18- to 29-year-olds still are the most likely to shop on Amazon, but those 60 or older who primarily shop through the site jumped 145.5% (9.6 percentage points). Target, Thrift stores and Wayfair also experienced growth compared with six months ago, up 1.6% (0.2 percentage point), 19.4% (1.9 percentage points) and 15.4% (0.2 percentage point), respectively.

Bed Bath & Beyond and Restoration Hardware, on the other hand, are seeing fewer respondents using these establishments for home décor and furnishings, down 22.1% (3 percentage points) and 46.2% (0.6 percentage points) since July. Bright spots for Restoration Hardware are households making $50,000 to $99,999, or at least $150,000, and respondents 60 or older. Blueshift’s Dec. 4, 2015, report found Restoration Hardware’s Modern line was a hit with designers and their clients, and sources said its timing and products would be able to capture consumers’ move to more modern designs.

 

Where do you shop the most for home décor and furnishings?

  • 17.3% mostly shop at Amazon for home décor and furnishings, up 71.3% (7.2 percentage points) from July.
    • All age groups increased their shopping on Amazon for home décor and furnishings from six months ago.
    • All income levels increased their shopping on Amazon compared with six months ago.
    • 18- to 29-year-olds still are the most likely to shop on Amazon for home décor and furnishings, but those 60 or older who primarily use Amazon jumped 145.5% (9.6 percentage points).
  • 12.9% primarily shop at Target for home décor and furnishings, up 1.6% (0.2 percentage point).
    • 45- to 59-year-olds were the only age group to increase their shopping at Target.
    • Households making less than $24,999 or $100,000 to $149,999 were the only income levels to increase their shopping at Target.
  • 11.7% shop at thrift stores the most for home décor and furnishings, up 19.4% (1.9 percentage points).
    • All age groups except 18- to 29-year-olds increased their shopping at thrift stores.
    • All household income levels, except $25,000 to $49,999 and $100,000 to $149,999, increased their shopping at thrift stores compared with six months ago.
  • 10.6% shop at Bed Bath & Beyond the most for home décor and furnishings, down 22.1% (3 percentage points).
    • All age groups decreased their shopping at Bed Bath & Beyond for home décor and furnishings.
    • All household incomes except those making $150,000 or more decreased their shopping at Bed Bath & Beyond compared with six months ago.
  • 1.5% shop at Wayfair the most for home décor and furnishings, a 15.4% (0.2 percentage-point) increase.
    • 30- to 44-year-olds and those 60 or older shop at Wayfair for home décor and furnishings more often than six months ago.
    • Households making $25,000 or more increased their shopping at Wayfair for home décor and furnishings.
  • 0.7% shops at Restoration Hardware the most for home décor and furnishings, down 46.2% (0.6 percentage point).
    • All age groups except respondents 60 or older shop less at Restoration Hardware for home décor and furnishings than six months ago.
    • Households making $50,000 to $99,999 or at least $150,000 were the only two income levels to shop at Restoration Hardware more often for home décor and furnishings.

 

 

4) In-car use of smartphone and satellite radio rises, but use of embedded infotainment systems and traditional radio declines.

Smartphone use increased more than any other form of in-car entertainment, up 45.5% (6.1 percentage points) year to year. All age groups are increasing their in-car use of smartphones; specifically, twice as many 45- to 59-year-olds are using smartphones in their cars compared with a year ago. The number of respondents using traditional radio in cars has fallen 30.9% (17.4 percentage points), but this entertainment form remains the most commonly used. Satellite radio usage is rising among all age groups and income levels above $25,000, which will benefit companies such as SiriusXM. Respondents continue to decrease their use of embedded infotainment system, which fell year to year among all age groups, except those 60 or older, and is now used by only 3.1%.

 

How do you consume most of your in-car entertainment?

  • 38.9% use traditional radio most frequently for auto entertainment, down 30.9% (17.4 percentage points).
  • 19.5% use a smartphone most frequently for auto entertainment, a 45.5% (6.1 percentage-point) increase.
    • Twice as many 45- to 59-year-olds use smartphones in their cars as a year ago.
    • All age groups increased their use of smartphones compared with a year ago.
  • 14.9% use satellite radio most frequently for auto entertainment, an 18.3% (2.3 percentage-point) increase.
    • All age groups increased their use of satellite radio compared with a year ago.
    • All household income levels, except those making less than $24,999, increased their use of satellite radio.
  • 9.6% use CDs/cassettes most frequently, up 21.5% (1.7 percentage points) compared with six months ago, when the answer debuted in our survey. This may be partly responsible for respondents’ decline in traditional radio use.
  • 3.1% use embedded systems most frequently for auto entertainment, a 27.9% (1.2 percentage-point) decrease.
    • All age groups, except those 60 or older, are less likely to use embedded infotainment systems year to year.

 

 

5) Almost 5% of respondents are very or extremely likely to buy an in-home virtual reality system in six months, around the time the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive are expected to go on sale.

Younger respondents, specifically 18- to 29-year-olds, are the most interested and most likely to purchase a virtual reality (VR) system for their homes in the next six months. 16.4%—mostly younger respondents and lower-income households—are very or extremely interested in using VR, while a third of respondents are not at all interested in using VR.

4.4% of respondents are very or extremely likely to purchase a VR system for their home in the next six months. These respondents are younger and live in lower-income households. Three-fourths of respondents, on the other hand, are not at all likely to buy a VR system for their home in the next six months.

Of the respondents who are likely to purchase a VR system in the next six months, almost 70% would pay $400 or less while 11.6% would pay $601 or more. All age groups hovered around 10% of respondents who would pay $601 or more for a VR system; 18- to 29-year-olds (13%) were the most likely.

Multiple VR systems are set to enter the market in 2016. These include Facebook Inc.’s (FB) Oculus Rift, which is slated for release sometime between April and June for $600; Sony Corp.’s (TYO:6758) PlayStation VR; and HTC Corp.’s (TPE:2498) Vive, which will go on sale in April.

 

How interested are you in using virtual reality?

  • 16.4% of respondents are very or extremely interested in using virtual reality.
    • Younger respondents are most likely to be very or extremely interested in using virtual reality.
    • Lower-income households are most likely to be very or extremely interested in using virtual reality.
  • 32% of respondents are not at all interested in using virtual reality.
    • Older respondents are the least likely to be interested in using virtual reality.
    • Households making $100,000 to $149,999 are the least likely to be interested in using virtual reality.

 

How likely are you to buy a virtual reality system for your home in the next six months?

  • 4.4% are very or extremely likely to purchase a virtual reality system for their home in the next six months.
    • Younger respondents are more very or extremely likely to purchase a virtual reality system.
    • Lower-income households are more very or extremely likely to purchase a virtual reality system.
  • 73.5% are not at all likely to purchase a virtual reality system for their home in the next six months.
    • Older respondents are the least likely to purchase a virtual reality system for their home.
    • Households making between $100,000 to $149,999 are the least likely to purchase a virtual reality system.

 

How much would you pay for a virtual reality system in your home?

  • 67.7% would pay $400 or less for a virtual reality system in their home.
  • 11.6% would pay $601 or more for a virtual reality system in their home.
    • All age groups hover around 10% of respondents who would pay $601 or more for a virtual reality system in their home; 18- to 29-year-olds (13%) are the most likely.
    • Households with incomes of $150,000 or more are the most likely to pay $601 or more.

 

 

6) Cord-cutting is growing, boosting most OTT services, particularly Netflix, YouTube and Hulu’s multiples services.

More respondents are moving away from both pay-TV services with add-on services and basic services than a year ago. Those who canceled their pay-TV service more than a month ago increased 95.8% (9.1 percentage points) to now encompass 18.6% of our respondents. The rate of cord-cutting (1.4%) also rose compared with last year, up 40% (0.4 percentage point). The rate of cord-nevers fell 31.7% (5.9 percentage points) compared with a year ago.

Expected cord-cutting also is on the rise as 10% of pay-TV subscribers are very or extremely likely to cancel their pay-TV subscription in the next six months, up 40.8% (2.9 percentage points) compared with six months ago. All age groups and households with incomes lower than $150,000 posted increases in being very or extremely likely to cancel their pay-TV subscription in the next six months.

Netflix Inc. (NLFX) remains the most frequently used online streaming TV service, and those using its service grew 12.5% (6.6 percentage points) compared with last year. Growth in Netflix use was found in all age groups. Google’s (Alphabet Inc., GOOG/GOOGL) YouTube is the second most used OTT; respondents using its service grew 24.8% (8.1 percentage points), the highest out of any OTT. The new YouTube Red service is piggybacking off this success. Respondents using YouTube Red almost tripled in number compared with last month. Hulu, Hulu Plus and Hulu Plus without ads all experienced growth in their respective times on the market. Use of the first two rose 35.3% (4.2 percentage points) and 24.7% (2.1 percentage points) year to year, and use of Hulu Plus without ads increased 40.5% (1.7 percentage points) quarter to quarter. Google Play also is experiencing growth compared with last year, up 77.8% (3.5 percentage points). This was due to increased use among all age groups, specifically 30- to 44-year-olds.

Time Warner Inc.’s (TWX) two HBO services are experiencing different volume changes in respondents’ usage rates. HBO Go use rose 5.5% (0.5 percentage point) compared with last year, but HBO Now use declined 20% (1.3 percentage points) compared with six months ago. Dish Network Corp’s (DISH) Sling TV has not seen any change in the number of respondents using its service compared with six months ago.

 

Do you use pay-TV in your household?

  • 35.6% use a basic pay-TV service, down 2.5% (0.9 percentage point) compared with a year ago.
  • 31.6% use pay-TV with add-on services, an 8.4% (2.9 percentage-point) decrease compared with a year ago.
    • All age groups except those 60 or older are using less pay-TV with add-on services compared with a year ago. Those at least 60 years old have maintained their usage.
  • 18.6% canceled their pay-TV service more than a month ago, up 95.8% (9.1 percentage points).
    • All age groups are more likely to have canceled their pay-TV service more than a month ago.
    • 18- to 29-year-olds are now the most likely to have canceled their pay-TV service more than a month ago.
  • 12.7% have never had a pay-TV service, down 31.7% (5.9 percentage points) compared with a year ago.
    • All age groups are less likely to have never had a pay-TV service compared with six months ago.
  • 1.4% canceled their pay-TV service in the past month, up 40% (0.4 percentage point).

 

How likely are you to cancel your pay-TV subscription in the next six months for only online streaming services?

  • Note: Only six months of data has been acquired for this question.
  • 10% of pay-TV subscribers are very or extremely likely to cancel their pay-TV subscription in the next six months, up 40.8% (2.9 percentage points) compared with six months ago.
    • All age groups, led by 30- to 44-year-olds, increased in being very or extremely likely to cancel pay-TV subscriptions in the next six months compared with last quarter.
    • Households with incomes lower than $150,000—led by those with incomes of $24,999 or less—were foremost in being very or extremely likely to cancel pay-TV subscriptions in the next six months.

 

Which online streaming TV services do you use? Select all that apply.

  • 59.3% use Netflix, up 12.5% (6.6 percentage points) compared with last year.
    • Younger respondents are more likely to use Netflix although all age groups are using the service more often.
  • 40.8% use YouTube, a 24.8% (8.1 percentage-point) increase compared with a year ago.
  • 25.8% use Amazon Instant Video, down 1.5% (0.4 percentage point) compared with last year.
    • 30- to 44-year-olds were the only age group to increase their use of Amazon Instant Video year to year.
  • 16.1% use Hulu, a 35.3% (4.2 percentage-point) increase compared with last year.
    • All age groups, except 18- to 29-year-olds, are using Hulu more often compared with last year.
  • 10.6% use Hulu Plus, up 24.7% (2.1 percentage points) compared with last year.
    • 18- to 44-year-olds use Hulu Plus more often compared with last year.
  • 9.6% use HBO Go, a 5.5% (0.5 percentage-point) increase compared with last year.
    • All age groups, except 18- to 29-year-olds, are using HBO Go more often year to year.
  • 8% use Google Play, up 77.8% (3.5 percentage points) compared with last year.
    • All age groups, led by 30- to 44-year-olds, are using Google Play more often.
  • 5.2% use HBO Now, a 20% (1.3 percentage-point) decrease compared with six months ago.
    • All age groups are using HBO Now less often compared with six months ago.
  • 4.2% use Hulu Plus without ads, up 40.5% (1.7 percentage points) compared with the previous quarter.
    • All age groups, except 18- to 29-year-olds, are using Hulu Plus without ads more often.
  • 2.2% use Sling TV, the same as six months ago.
    • 18- to 29-year-olds and those 60 or older were two age groups to increase their use of Sling TV.
  • 21% do not use any online streaming services, 26.1% (7.4 percentage points) higher than a year ago.
    • All household incomes are more likely to use an online streaming service compared with last year.

 

 

7) Respondents are purchasing items through ads on Facebook more than through any other social media site. Facebook’s Instagram also is seeing impressive growth in ad-related purchase rates.

Respondents are increasing their purchases through social media ads compared with six months ago, among all age groups and all household income levels, except those making between $25,000 to $49,999 and $100,000 to $149,999. Most purchases continue to be done through ads on Facebook but at an increasing rate, up 47.6% (3.9 percentage points) compared with six months ago. Items purchased through ads on Facebook’s Instagram also increased 40% compared with six months ago. Blueshift’s Jan. 21 Facebook advertising report showed ad revenue for the company growing as clients diversify their social media budgets. This also benefited Instagram and Pinterest, but showed little gain for Twitter Inc. (TWTR). Respondents’ purchases through Pinterest decreased 8% (0.2 percentage points), but Pinterest is the No. 2 site through which to make an ad-related purchase. Fewer purchases were made through ads on Twitter than six months ago, and it remains respondents’ least-used social media site for ad-related purchases.

 

Have you bought any products through a social media ad?

  • Overall, 17.8% have bought a product through a social media ad, up 29% (4 percentage points) from six months ago.
    • All age groups, led by 18- to 29-year-olds, increased their purchases through social media ads.
    • All household income levels, except those making between $25,000 to $49,999 and $100,000 to $149,999, increased their purchases through social media ads. This was led by those at least $150,000.
  • 12.1% bought a product through an ad on Facebook, a 47.6% (3.9 percentage-point) increase.
  • 2.3% bought a product through an ad on Pinterest, an 8% (0.2 percentage-point) decrease.
  • 1.4% bought a product through an ad on Instagram, a 40% (0.4 percentage-point) increase.
  • 0.5% bought a product through an ad on Twitter, a 16.7% (0.1 percentage-point) decrease.

 

 

8) Airbnb pulls ahead to become the most preferred vacation/property rental site.

Airbnb mentions have risen 24.6% (1.7 percentage points) quarter to quarter, and it now is the most preferred vacation/property rental site. More 18- to 44-year-olds prefer to use Airbnb than last quarter. Preference for Priceline’s Booking.com, which was No. 2, decreased 1.5% (0.1 percentage point) quarter to quarter. VRBO and HomeAway (both owned by Expedia) rounded out the top four vacation/property rental sites, growing 3.1% (0.2 percentage point) and 4.2% (0.1 percentage point), respectively.

 

What is your preferred vacation/property rental site?

  • 8.6% prefer to use Airbnb, a 24.6% (1.7 percentage-point) increase quarter to quarter.
    • 30- to 44-year-olds are more likely than other age groups to use Airbnb, closely followed by 18- to 29-year-olds. Both were the only age groups to increase their use of the service quarter to quarter.
    • 45- to 59-year-olds decreased their preference for Airbnb quarter to quarter, but those 60 or older maintained their use of the site.
  • 6.8% prefer to use Booking.com, down 1.5% (0.1 percentage point) quarter to quarter.
    • 18- to 29-year-olds are more likely than other age groups to use Booking.com, but all age groups except 45- to 59-year-olds had less preference for the service quarter to quarter.
  • 6.6% prefer to use VRBO, a 3.1% (0.2 percentage-point) increase quarter to quarter.
    • Older respondents are more likely than their younger counterparts to use VRBO.
    • The number of 18- to 44-year-olds who prefer VRBO increased quarter to quarter.
  • 2.5% prefer to use HomeAway, up 4.2% (0.1 percentage point) quarter to quarter.
    • Younger respondents are more likely than their older counterparts to use HomeAway.
    • 18- to 29-year-olds and 45- to 59-year-olds were the only two age groups to increase their use of HomeAway.

 

 

9) Skechers and Under Armour continue to grow in the athletic shoe market; Nike strengthens lead.

Respondents’ intent to purchase athletic shoes from Skechers USA Inc. (SKX) increased 35.9% (2.8 percentage points) compared with six months ago, second only to Nike Inc. (NKE). Skechers now is the fourth most sought-after brand of athletic shoes. 18- to 29-year-olds’ likelihood of purchasing Skechers shoes in the next six months grew 77.8%.

Nike reigns over all other athletic shoe brands that respondents plan to buy in the next six months. It widened its lead among respondents, rising 22.5% (5 percentage points) in likely purchases. All age groups are more likely to purchase Nike shoes compared with six months ago. New Balance Athletics Inc. remains the second most sought-after athletic shoe brand that respondents plan to buy in the next six months, up 10.4% (1.6 percentage points).

More respondents plan to purchase Adidas AG (ADDYY) shoes compared with six months ago, up 15.8% (1.5 percentage points). The increase is due to greater interest among 18- to 29-year-olds and 45- to 59-year-olds.

Under Armour Inc. (UA) continues to pick up respondents planning to buy its shoes, up 56.7% (1.7 percentage points). This was due to increased interest from all age groups, specifically younger respondents. Blueshift’s Jan. 27 Under Armour report reiterates our findings of rising interest among younger athletes. Our report also noted the brand is making inroads through its cleats and that it holds strong potential in basketball, thanks to its partnership with Stephen Curry.

 

Which brands of athletic shoes do you plan to buy in the next six months? Select all that apply.

  • 27.2% plan to buy Nike shoes in the next six months, up 22.5% (5 percentage points) compared with July.
    • All age groups are more likely to purchase Nike shoes in the next six months.
  • 17% plan to buy New Balance shoes in the next six months, up 10.4% (1.6 percentage points).
    • All age groups are more likely to purchase New Balance shoes in the next six months.
  • 11% plan to buy Adidas shoes in the next six months, a 15.8% (1.5 percentage-point) increase.
    • 18- to 29-year-olds and 45- to 59-year-olds are more likely to purchase Adidas in the next six months.
  • 10.6% plan to buy Skechers shoes in the next six months, a 35.9% (2.8 percentage-point) increase.
    • 30- to 44-year-olds were the only age group to be less likely than six months ago to purchase Skechers.
    • 18- to 29-year-olds’ likelihood of purchasing Skechers shoes in the next six months grew 77.8%.
  • 4.7% plan to buy Under Armour shoes in the next six months, up 56.7% (1.7 percentage points).
    • All age groups are more likely to purchase Under Armour shoes in the next six months.
    • 18- to 29-year-olds’ likelihood of purchasing Under Armour shoes has doubled since October.
  • 32.2% do not plan to buy athletic shoes in the next six months, down 17.6% (6.9 percentage points).

 

 

10) Slightly more than 15% plan to purchase at least one gun in the next three months.

In our first look at the market for gun purchases, we found that 63.5% of respondents do not own a gun and have no plans to buy one in the next three months. These respondents mostly are younger and make $25,000 to $49,999.

20.2% of respondents own at least one gun, but are not planning to purchase another one in the next three months. They mostly are older and make $100,000 to $149,999.

7.8% of respondents expect to buy their first gun in the next three months. Four and a half times as many respondents are buying only their first gun (6.4%) as those who are buying multiple guns, including their first gun (1.4%). 8.5% are buying a gun to add to their collections. Almost twice as many respondents who own a gun are buying only one gun to add to their collections (5.5%) as those who are adding multiple guns to their collections in the next three months (3%)

 

Are you planning to purchase a gun in the next three months?

  • 63.5% are not planning to purchase a gun and do not own any guns.
    • Younger respondents are the most likely to not own a gun and to have no plans to buy one in the next three months.
    • Households making $25,000 to $49,999 are the most likely to not own a gun and to not have plans to purchase one, followed by those making $24,999 or less.
  • 20.2% are not planning to purchase a gun in the next three months, but own at least one gun.
    • Older respondents are the most likely to own at least one gun but to have no plans to purchase another in the next three months.
    • Households making $100,000 to $149,999 are the most likely to own at least one gun but to have no plans to buy another in the next three months.
  • 7.8% plan to buy their first gun in the next three months.
    • Four and a half times as many respondents plan to buy just their first gun (6.4%) as those who plan to buy multiple guns, including their first one (1.4%).
    • 30- to 59-year-olds, followed by 18- to 29-year-olds, are the most likely to buy their first gun in the next three months.
    • Households making $24,999 or less are the most likely to purchase their first gun in the next three months.
  • 8.5% plan to buy a gun to add to their collections.
    • Almost twice as many respondents who own a gun plan to buy one to add to their collections (5.5%) as those who plan to add multiple guns to their collections in the next three months (3%).
    • 45- to 59-year-olds are the most likely to purchase guns to add to their collections in the next three months.
    • Households making $150,000 or more are the most likely to purchase guns to add to their collections in the next three months, followed by those making between $50,000 to $99,999.

 

 

11) Fewer respondents own gas-powered vehicles, and the number of those choosing to not own a car is growing faster than those adopting hybrid or electric vehicles.

The number of respondents who own gas-powered cars fell 3.9% (3.3 percentage points) compared with a year ago, while those not owning a car at all increased 34.9% (3 percentage points). Hybrid car owners increased 2.1% (0.1 percentage point), while electric car owners grew 27.3% (0.3 percentage point) from 12 months ago. All age groups, except 30- to 44-year-olds, and all household income levels, except those making $50,000 to $99,999, increased their adoption of hybrid cars. 18- to 29-year-olds, 45- to 59-year-olds and all household income levels, except those making $50,000 to $99,999, increased their adoption of EVs.

More respondents are not at all likely to purchase a hybrid or electric vehicle for their next car, up 5% (2.3 percentage points) from six months ago, and fewer respondents are very or extremely likely to make such a purchase. Overall, however, 20.5% more respondents are committed to buying a hybrid or electric vehicle since July. 18- to 29-year-olds who are committed to making a hybrid or EV purchase tripled in number compared with six months ago.

 

Which type of car do you own?

  • 82.1% of respondents own a gas-powered car, down 3.9% (3.3 percentage points) compared with last year.
  • 11.6% of respondents do not own a car, up 34.9% (3 percentage points) compared with last year.
    • 18- to 29-year-olds were the only age group to have fewer respondents who do not own a car than last year.
  • 4.9% of respondents own a hybrid car, a 2.1% (0.1 percentage-point) increase compared with last year.
    • All age groups, except 30- to 44-year-olds, have increased their adoption of hybrid cars since last year.
    • All household income levels, except those making $50,000 to $99,999, increase their adoption of hybrid cars compared with last year.
  • 1.4% of respondents own an electric car, a 27.3% (0.3 percentage-point) increase compared with last year.
    • 18- to 29-year-olds and 45- to 59-year-olds were the only age groups to increase their EV adoption.
    • All household income levels, except those making $25,000 to $49,999 or at least $150,000, increased their electric car adoption compared with last year.

 

How likely are you to purchase a hybrid or electric vehicle for your next car?

  • 48.5% are not at all likely to purchase a hybrid or electric vehicle for their next car, up 5% (2.3 percentage points) compared with six months ago.
  • 9.4% are very or extremely likely to purchase a hybrid or electric vehicle for their next car, down 12.1% (1.3 percentage points) compared with six months ago.
    • 18- to 44-year-olds were the top age group to be very or extremely likely of purchasing a hybrid or electric vehicle compared with six months ago.
    • Households making $150,000 or more were the top income level to be very or extremely likely of purchasing a hybrid or electric vehicle compared with six months ago.
  • 4.7% are committed to making a hybrid or electric vehicle purchase, a 20.5% (0.8 percentage-point) increase.
    • 18- to 29-year-olds who are committed to making a hybrid or electric vehicle purchase tripled in number compared with six months ago.
    • 18- to 29-year-olds and 45- to 59-year-olds have more respondents committed to making a hybrid or electric vehicle purchase than in July.
    • All household income levels, except those making $25,000 to $49,999, are more likely to commit to making a hybrid or electric vehicle purchase than six months ago.

 

 

12) More respondents are indifferent on GMO foods and on whether they should be labeled.

The number of respondents who are indifferent regarding GMO foods grew 0.3% (0.1 percentage point) year to year. Those in favor of GMO foods dropped 13% (1.4 percentage points). Those opposed to GMO foods and do not buy them decreased 3.7% (10.5 percentage points) while those opposed GMO foods but who buy them anyway increased 26.7% (5.1 percentage points).

Fewer respondents believe GMO foods should be labeled, but still three-fourths of our respondents support labeling. Those indifferent on the matter increased 36.2% (5.1 percentage points) year to year.

 

What are your views on GMO foods?

  • 34.7% are indifferent about GMO foods, up 0.3% (0.1 percentage point) compared with a year ago.
  • 31.7% oppose GMO foods and do not buy them, down 3.7% (10.5 percentage points).
    • Older respondents are the most likely to oppose GMO foods and not buy them, but 18- to 29-year-olds were the only age group to increase their opposition to GMO foods compared with a year ago.
    • Households making $0 to $24,999 are the most opposed to GMO foods and will not buy them, and were the only age group to post a higher percentage compared with a year ago.
  • 24.2% oppose GMO foods but buy them anyway, up 26.7% (5.1 percentage points) compared with a year ago.
  • 9.4% are in favor of GMO foods and buy them, down 13% (1.4 percentage points) compared with a year ago.

 

Should GMO foods be labeled?

  • 74.9% believe GMO foods should be labeled, down 7.4% (6 percentage points) compared with a year ago.
  • 19.2% are indifferent regarding GMO food labeling, up 36.2% (5.1 percentage points).
  • 6% believe GMO foods should not be labeled, a 20% (1 percentage-point) increase compared with a year ago.

 

 

13) Digital or mobile wallet use is growing at a sluggish pace.

Slightly more respondents are using mobile or digital wallets than last year, and in January alone more respondents have signed up for the service year to year. This shows a slow increase in the adoption of mobile or digital wallets. Slightly more respondents are using digital or mobile wallets compared with a year ago, up 1.7% (0.6 percentage point). This is due to increased use among 18- to 29-year-olds, 45- to 59-year-olds and households making $0 to $24,999 and $150,000 or above. Those who started using a digital or mobile wallet in the last month grew 27.3% (0.6 percentage point) compared with a year ago.

 

Have you used a digital or mobile wallet in the last month?

  • 35.9% have used a digital or mobile wallet in the last month, a 1.7% (0.6 percentage-point) increase year to year.
    • 18- to 29-year-olds and 45- to 59-year-olds increased their use of digital or mobile wallets in January.
    • Households making $0 to $24,999 and $150,000 or above were the only two income levels to increase their use of digital or mobile wallets compared with a year ago; those with an income of $150,000 or higher increased their use by 30.3% (10.4 percentage points).
  • 2.8% just started using a digital or mobile wallet in the last month, a 27.3% (0.6 percentage-point) increase.

 

 

14) iOS users are slowly adopting ad-blocking tools and apps, with a link to iOS 9’s newer additions.

More respondents are using ad-blocking tools than last quarter. Overall, we noted a quarter-to-quarter decline in both those who have never used ad blocking and have no plans to use such tools/apps (16.1% or 7.2 percentage points), and those who have never used ad blocking but may start in the next three months (7.6% or 2.6 percentage points). iOS (Apple Inc./AAPL) customers are no longer the device owners with the lowest rate of ad-blocking usage. The number of iOS users who have started using ad blocking in the last three months grew slightly since October. This shows a slow adoption of iOS 9’s new ad blocking tools that were pointed out by website publishers in Blueshift’s Aug. 3 Ad Tech report.

Android users remain the most likely to use ad-blocking tools or apps on their smartphones, and more users of this Google OS are adopting ad blocking quarter to quarter.

 

Which best describes your use of ad-blocking tools or apps on your smartphone?

  • 32.1% have never used ad blocking on mobile devices and have no plans to use such tools/apps, down 3.6% (1.2 percentage points) quarter to quarter.
    • 46.5% of Windows (Microsoft Corp./MSFT) phone users have never used ad blocking on their mobile devices and have no plans to use such tools/apps, up 12.9% (5.3 percentage points) quarter to quarter.
    • 37.6% of iOS users have never used ad blocking on their mobile devices and have no plans to use such tools/apps, down 16.1% (7.2 percentage points) quarter to quarter.
    • 35.9% of Android users have never used ad blocking on their mobile devices and have no plans to use such tools/apps, down 4.3% (1.6 percentage points) quarter to quarter.
    • 18- to 29-year-olds are the most likely to have never used ad blocking on their mobile devices and to have no plans to use such tools or apps.
  • 26.3% have never used ad blocking on mobile devices but may start in the next three months, down 0.8% (0.2 percentage point) quarter to quarter.
    • 31.8% of iOS users have never used ad blocking on their mobile devices but may start in the next three months, a 7.6% (2.6 percentage-point) decrease quarter to quarter.
    • 30.1% of Android users have never used ad blocking on their mobile devices but may start in the next three months, down 2% (0.6 percentage point) quarter to quarter.
    • 25.6% of Windows phone users have never used ad blocking on their mobile devices but may start in the next three months, a 21% (6.8 percentage-point) decrease quarter to quarter.
  • 13.3% have used ad blocking on mobile devices for more than three months but have no plans to add new tools/apps, up 25.5% (2.7 percentage point) quarter to quarter.
    • 18.1% of Android users have used ad blocking for more than three months but have no plans to add new tools/apps, a 7.7% (1.3 percentage-point) increase quarter to quarter.
    • 12.8% of iOS users have used ad blocking for more than three months but have no plans to add new tools/apps, up 45.5% (4 percentage points) quarter to quarter.
    • 11.6% of Window phone users have used ad blocking for more than three months but have no plans to add new tools/apps, a 31.8% (2.8 percentage-point) increase quarter to quarter.
  • 6.1% have used ad blocking on mobile devices for more than three months and are considering adding more tools/apps in the near future, up 35.6% (1.6 percentage point) quarter to quarter.
    • 6.9% of Android users have used ad blocking for more than three months and are considering adding more tools/apps in the near future, a 23.2% (1.3 percentage-point) increase quarter to quarter.
    • 8.1% of iOS users have used ad blocking for more than three months and are considering adding more tools/apps in the near future, a 58.8% (3 percentage-point) increase quarter to quarter.
    • 2.3% of Window phone users have used ad blocking for more than three months and are considering adding more tools/apps in the near future, a 20.7% (0.6 percentage-point) decrease quarter to quarter.
  • 4.6% began using ad blocking on mobile devices in the past three months but have no plans to add other tools/apps, a 31.4% (1.1 percentage-point) increase quarter to quarter.
    • 9.3% of Windows users began using ad blocking in the past three months but have no plans to add other tools/apps, up 5.7% (0.5 percentage point) quarter to quarter.
    • 5.9% of iOS users began using ad blocking in the past three months but have no plans to add other tools/apps, an 84.4% (2.7 percentage-point) increase quarter to quarter.
    • 4.9% of Android users began using ad blocking in the past three months but have no plans to add other tools/apps, the same quarter to quarter.
  • 3.6% began using ad blocking on mobile devices in the past three months and are considering adding more tools/apps, a 2.9% (0.1 percentage-point) increase quarter to quarter.
    • 4.7% of Windows users began using ad blocking in the past three months and are considering adding more tools/apps, a 20.3% (1.2 percentage-point) decrease quarter to quarter.
    • 4% of Android users began using ad blocking in the past three months and are considering adding more tools/apps, down 13% (0.6 percentage point) quarter to quarter.
    • 3.9% of iOS users began using ad blocking in the past three months and are considering adding more tools/apps, a 5.4% (0.2 percentage-point) increase quarter to quarter.
  • 14.1% do not own a smartphone, a 22.5% (4.1 percentage-point) decrease quarter to quarter.

 

What type of operating system does your phone run?

  • 50.2% use an Android.
    • 45- to 59-year-olds are the most likely to use Android.
  • 40.2% use iOS.
    • 18- to 29-year-olds are the most likely to use iOS.
  • 4.8% use a Windows phone.
  • 1.7% use a BlackBerry Ltd. (BBRY) OS.

 

 

15) Hillary Clinton is gaining more support and is seeing her lead shrink as Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump surge in the 2016 presidential race. An increasing number of respondents, approaching 20%, said they will not vote in the upcoming election.

Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump all saw increasing support compared with three months ago. Ted Cruz saw the second biggest jump (up 213.3% or 3.2 percentage points) and now is firmly entrenched as the fourth candidate in the race. Ben Carson’s and Carly Fiorina’s candidacies took major hits among respondents. This data was collected before the fourth Democratic debate on Jan. 17.

Respondents across all ages and income levels, but specifically those who are younger and/or less wealthy, are more likely to not vote in the 2016 presidential election. 17.6% do not plan to vote, up 23.1% (3.3 percentage points) quarter to quarter.

Trump is the leading candidate among gun owners (25.9%), followed by Clinton (16.1%) and Sanders (14%), while respondents who do not own guns said they would vote for Clinton (27.6%) or Sanders (24.6%), then Trump (10.3%).

Clinton remains the top candidate for whom respondents would vote in the 2016 presidential election, and those who would do so increased 6.8% (1.5 percentage points) quarter to quarter. 30- to 59-year-olds and/or those making $99,999 or less have increased their support for Clinton.

Sanders is picking up steam, with mentions rising 10.7% (2 percentage points) quarter to quarter. Leading the charge are 18- to 29-year-olds and 45- to 59-year-olds, and/or those with income levels of $99,999 or less. 18- to 29-year-olds have increased their support of Sanders the most, up 37.4% or 8.6 percentage points.

Trump support has jumped 27% (3.4 percentage points) quarter to quarter. All age groups, except 18- to 29-year-olds, have increased their support for Trump since October. All household income levels, except those making $25,000 to $49,999, increased their support for Trump quarter to quarter.

A growing number of respondents in all age groups plan to vote by potential candidate (80.4%) rather than by political party.

 

Who will you vote for in the 2016 presidential race?

  • 23.4% will vote for Hillary Clinton, a 6.8% (1.5 percentage-point) increase quarter to quarter ago.
    • Older respondents remain the most supportive of Clinton, but 30- to 59-year-olds were the primary respondents to increase their support quarter to quarter.
    • Households making $99,999 or less increased their support for Clinton quarter to quarter.
    • 27.6% of respondents who do not own guns will vote for Clinton, while 16.1% of gun owners will do the same. (Filtered by gun owners)
  • 20.7% will vote for Bernie Sanders, up 10.7% (2 percentage points) quarter to quarter.
    • Younger respondents remain the most supportive of Sanders, but 18- to 29-year-olds and 45- to 59-year-olds alike increased their support quarter to quarter.
    • 18- to 29-year-olds increased their support the most, up 37.4% or 8.6 percentage points.
    • Households making $99,999 or less increased their support for Sanders quarter to quarter. Those making $50,000 to $99,999 posted the greatest increase, up 37.7% or 6 percentage points.
    • 24.6% of respondents who do not own guns will vote for Bernie Sanders, while 14% of gun owners will do the same. (Filtered by gun owners)
  • 16% will vote for Donald Trump, a 27% (3.4 percentage-point) increase quarter to quarter.
    • All age groups, except 18- to 29-year-olds, increased their support for Trump quarter to quarter.
    • All household income levels, except those making $25,000 to $49,999, increased their support for Trump compared with six months ago.
    • 25.9% of gun owners will vote for Trump, while 10.3% of respondents who do not own guns will do the same. (Filtered by gun owners)
  • 4.7% will vote for Ted Cruz, a 213.3% (3.2 percentage-point) increase quarter to quarter.
    • All age groups increased their support for Ted Cruz quarter to quarter.
    • All household income levels increased their support for Ted Cruz quarter to quarter.
    • 8.4% of gun owners will vote for Ted Cruz, while 2.6% of respondents who do not own guns will do the same. (Filtered by gun owners)
  • 3.4% will vote for Marco Rubio, a 5.5% (0.2 percentage-point) decrease quarter to quarter.
    • 18- to 44-year-olds increased their support for Rubio compared quarter to quarter.
    • Households making $49,999 or less or at least $150,000 increased their support for Rubio.
    • 3.7% of gun owners will vote for Marco Rubio, while 3.2% of respondents who do not own guns will do the same. (Filtered by gun owners)
  • 2.3% will vote for Jeb Bush, down 17.9% (0.5 percentage point) quarter to quarter.
    • 18- to 29-year-olds and 45- to 59-year-olds decreased their support for Bush quarter to quarter.
    • Household making $49,999 or less or between $100,000 and $149,999 decreased their support for Bush.
    • 2.6% of gun owners will vote for Jeb Bush, while 2.1% of respondents who do not own guns will do the same. (Filtered by gun owners)
  • 17.6% will not be voting in the 2016 presidential election, up 23.1% (3.3 percentage points) quarter to quarter.
    • 18- to 29-year-olds are the age group most likely not to vote, but all age groups are more likely not to vote than they were in October.
    • All household income levels have more respondents who will not be voting in the 2016 election compared with last quarter.
    • 20.5% of respondents who do not own guns plan not to vote, while 12.7% of gun owners will do the same. (Filtered by gun owners)

 

How will you vote in the 2016 presidential election?

  • 80.4% will vote by potential candidate, up 6.5% (4.9 percentage points) compared with six months ago.
    • All age groups hover between 75% and 86% in voting by potential candidate.
    • All age groups increased in their likelihood of voting by candidate rather than political party compared with six months ago.

 

 


Report analysis by Mason Rudy.